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We need security, not more military

28.05.20
The defence industry is busy to sell its message that investing into armaments is a way out of the sour economic times and international developments laying ahead. It does so on national, as well as European levels. But is that what Europe, the world needs? Big spenders In April 2020 the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute published its figures on military expenditures on 2019 for... read more >

Hypersonic weapons: fast and dangerous

13.05.20
Since the Gulf War of 1990-1991, a wide array of new military technology has been developed. This includes new risky techniques like machine learning to enhance nuclear C3 systems, with the huge danger of the US or its competitors inadvertently accelerate crisis instability. It includes adaptions to brains to make them more useful for military operations. It can also bring change to what seems to... read more >

Imports and exports both part of military policy

29.04.20
Arms trade has two sides; the export by one is the import by the other. Arms export is controlled in most countries but import is not. Although it may have large and long term consequences for security and human rights. Not in the country importing, but in the country of export. Turkish import Since Ankara started the invasion of northern Syria in October 2019 arms exports to Turkey are... read more >

The future is now

16.04.20
In the coming months decisions will be taken with long term consequences for military expenditure and arms production. The arms industry has been shifting parts of its production from swords to ploughshares recently to help producing the medical equipment needed to fight the corona virus. This was widely reported by the industry, press and by governments. But not all swords went to the forgery.... read more >

The security paradigm is changing

04.04.20
Early March, production lines in Italy and Japan for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter closed because of corona. The virus affects even the world's largest military program ever. Military power has its limits when facing a pandemic. Troops are brought home from foreign deployments such as Iraq and US military exercises like Defender 2020 are scaled down if not fully stopped. All of the approx. 5,... read more >

(resend) New Dutch submarines; how about proliferation?

19.03.20
(corrected version) The Netherlands is in the midst of a multi billion euro acquisition of new conventional submarines to replace its current class. Recently the acquisition process was scrutinised by a large amount of questions (267) by members of the parliament to the government. The acquisition has a defence-industrial component and will impact future European arms exports as well as the... read more >

New Dutch submarines; how about proliferation?

19.03.20
The Netherlands is in the midst of a multi billion euro acquisition of new conventional submarines to replace its current class. Recently the acquisition process was scrutinised by a large amount of questions (267) by members of the parliament to the government. The acquisition has a defence-industrial component and will impact future European arms exports as well as the proliferation of... read more >

Not management, not shareholders but employees pay for Airbus underperformance

05.03.20
Airbus is a European civil-military aeronautic company based in France, Germany and Spain. It is 26 per cent state-owned (see figure, click to enlarge). For financial and organisational reasons it has its official headquarters in tax haven the Netherlands (see table). Airbus is the worlds largest builder of civil air liners, but produces also helicopters, fighter jets, drones, cybertechnology and... read more >

Turkish defence industry not a miracle

17.02.20
Turkish foreign and military policy becomes rapidly more assertive and autonomous. It can be seen in the Syria policy from the invasion to the current armed stand-off, in trafficking weapons to Libyan allies, in obstructing EU collaboration with NATO and in President Erdogan concluding agreements on defence industrial cooperation with other countries, from Malaysia to Senegal and Ukraine, on a... read more >

The Panel of Experts on arms exports to Libya

08.01.20
With all eyes on Iran, developments in other parts of the conflict-torn region are ongoing almost outside the eyes of the public. Troops of Commander Haftar’s self-styled Libyan National Army (LNA, supported by the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Egypt) declared a final and decisive battle to take Tripoli last month. Fighting and shelling between the two sides of the conflict has been raging there... read more >

Damen to help Nigerian military to transport troops and weapons in Delta

10.12.19
In a video clip the use of the Landing Ship Transport 120 can be watched; ramps unfold and weapon systems are boarded. The ship is developed by the Dutch conglomerate of ship wharfs Damen. Tanks (up to 70 tons), vessels and armoured vehicles can be brought aboard in several ways at different spots of the ship. Construction of a slightly smaller type of the class, the LST 100, for the Nigerian... read more >

Brexit; arms production and sales part II - EU/UK arms trade

05.11.19
Brexit; arms production and sales part II - EU/UK arms trade After Brexit, the UK Government aims continuation of existing policies on arms exports. Which means maintaining broadly the same policy as the EU on export control and sanctions legislation. "This included preparing for a no-deal scenario by transposing EU export control legislation into UK law through the EU (Withdrawal) Act, and... read more >

Brexit, arms production and export. Part I – UK - EU production relations

29.10.19
Brexit, arms production and export. Part I – UK - EU production relations The desperate call for ordurrrrrr is what comes to mind when speaking about Brexit, almost as if it is a Shakespearean tragedy instead of a reality affecting the economic and social life in the UK, the EU and the wider world. What effect Brexit may have on the future of arms sales and defence production in Europe,... read more >

Components for War

15.10.19
While war is knocking at European doors Brussels is not even able to decide on a common arms embargo on Turkey. Once upon a time, the European Union was considered an example that another security policy was possible. A security that was based on the power of negotiation instead of military force. With two EU initiatives to support the defence industry, nowadays Europe is quickly loosing its... read more >

India a major customer for EU weaponry

30.09.19
India a major customer for EU weaponry Already for decades, India is a major client for the EU arms industry. According to the latest offical EU figures available, it is the second most important destination for European Member States' export of weapons and military technology in 2017. Licenses valued the enormous amount of 12 billion were issued. Herewith India followed only Saudi Arabia... read more >

Economic and power relations at the cost of human suffering

14.08.19
Arms exports to the Saudi led coalition Since the peace agreement of half a year ago the situation in Yemen has only worsened: new frontlines, more people homeless and not enough supplies to help those in need. With the recent surge of the conflict in Aden the war has become even more complex. The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has withdrawn its troops but first it established a network of... read more >

Unmanned underwater weaponry

16.07.19
While in 2006 two thirds of the military budget in EU countries went to personnel, in 2017 this was less than half. Weapons are outdated more quickly and replaced at a faster rate, often because of new technology. Cyberspace is added to the traditional military domains of land, air, sea and space. New kinds of communication technology enables commanders to sent and receive massive amounts of... read more >

F-35: crowbar to break Chinese border defences

21.05.19
F-35: crowbar to break Chinese border defences There are 3 different types of the F-35: the A, B and C variants. Most countries buy the F-35A, the lastest generation of a conventional fighter aircraft. The F-35B type has the capability for short take off and vertical landing (STOVL), which makes it a ideal type for short-field bases, small aircraft carriers and large amphibious ships. The C type... read more >